logo

姫島盆踊り | Himeshima Bon Odori

15世紀ごろ始まり、約500年の歴史を持つ盆踊り。
それは念仏を唱えながら踊る、念仏踊りから発展したものと言われている。
やぐらの上で太鼓が音頭を取りその周りを踊るのが典型的な形式である。
現在では信仰性は失われているが、年に一度この世に戻ってくる死者の魂を迎え、また送るための風習に発したものであり
また戦後あたりまで多くの日本人にとって事実上最大の娯楽であった。

盆踊りの期間には、各地区ごとの盆坪と呼ばれる会場と中央広場との計7会場が設けられ、
踊り手は地区毎に15~20名が一組となって、まず各自の地区の盆坪で踊り、次いで島内各地の盆坪を巡って踊る。
踊りは、伝統踊りと創作踊りとに大別され、伝統踊りにはアヤ踊り、キツネ踊り、猿丸太夫、銭太鼓等がある。
創作踊りは、毎年新しく作られるもので、ほとんどはその年限りである。
アヤ踊り、キツネ踊り、猿丸太夫、銭太鼓は、姫島村の無形文化財に指定されている。

Bon Odori (Bon dancing) has a history of about 500 years, beginning around the 15th century.

The dancing is said to have evolved from Nembutsu Odori (Buddhist prayer dance), in which the name of the Buddha is chanted. The typical style of Bon Odori is for a drummer, who is located on the top of tower, to lead the dancers in their dance around the tower. These days, Bon Odori no longer has a religious quality, but is more a custom where ***the spirits of the deceased who return to earth once a year are greeted and then sent off again. Bon Odori also served as the major form of amusement for many Japanese until around the time of WWII.

During the Bon Odori season, a total of seven dancing sites are set up: a central site, and independent sites, which are known as bon-tsubo, for each of the districts on the island. Fifteen to twenty people form a group of dancers in each of these districts. The group first dances in its own district, then travels around the island and dances in the bon-tsubo in each of the other districts.

Himeshima Bon Odori can roughly be divided into two styles: traditional dances and newly created dances. Traditional dances include Aya Odori, Kitsune Odori, Saruman-dayu, and Zeni-daiko. The newly created dances are created from scratch each year and are generally danced only in that year.

Aya Odori, Kitsune Odori, Saruman-dayu, and Zeni-daiko are designated intangible cultural assets of Himeshima-mura.

Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Google Bookmarks



コメントは停止中です。

YOU MAY LIKE

スクリーンショット 2014-04-01 21.45.34

日本酒|SAKE